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Coronavirus: How to clean your keyboard and mouse properly

With Coronavirus spreading globally, keeping your gadgets clean is important – particularly your phone screen, keyboard and mouse.

You can read our guide to keeping your phone clean here, and read below for how to clean keyboards and keep them bacteria free.

What do you need to clean?

Your personal laptop is probably fine, as it will have the germs that are usually on your body.

However, if you share a computer with others at work, you should gently wipe it down.

Take particular care with the keyboard and mouse, as these are what you touch most often.

These are a little bit tougher than your smartphone, so you can take more aggressive measures, like using a can of compressed air.

How to clean a keyboard and mouse

Start with a shake to knock loose any debris and move on to disinfectant wipes.

As with phones, don’t use harsh cleaning chemicals or any type of bleach, as you might damage the finish of your gadgets.

Keyboards and mice aren’t waterproofed in the same way phones are, so keep moisture to a minimum and dry everything off well.

If you’re cleaning a whole laptop, then your tools of choice should be a can of compressed air, a microfiber cloth, and a very small amount of water where necessary.

According to Dell, a 50:50 isopropyl alcohol and water mixture can be used on the screens attached to its computers, applied from a damp cloth, but go carefully.

Once again, don’t use sprays or any harsher chemicals, no matter how rough the mess.

Use Disinfecting Wipes

Apple recently updated its advice to back the use of wipes.

“Using a 70 percent isopropyl alcohol wipe or Clorox Disinfecting Wipes, you may gently wipe the hard, nonporous surfaces of your Apple product, such as the display, keyboard, or other exterior surfaces,” it says.

“Don’t use bleach. Avoid getting moisture in any opening, and don’t submerge your Apple product in any cleaning agents. Don’t use on fabric or leather surfaces.”

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Latest Posts

How to join a Zoom meeting

There are dozens of different ways to make video calls, but Zoom has emerged as one of the most popular. It's simple to use, and we've put together a guide to joining your first Zoom meeting.

iOS 14: All about Apple’s new iPhone software

Apple has unveiled the newest software for its iPhone and iPad, called iOS and iPadOS 14. Coming in September, it's got a new home screen and loads of other new features.

The best broadband deals for Seniors

There are dozens of different ways to get broadband at home, and many providers offer special deals for seniors. Here's how to get them.

Coronavirus shows how ageism is harming the health of older adults

Paul Nash, Associate Professor of Gerontology at University of Southern California and Phillip W. Schnarrs, Associate Professor of Population Health, University of Texas at Austin, say ageism causing massive misconceptions about senior health.